What’s the point of open source without contributors? Turns out, there are several

Commentary: Here are reasons to open source your code even if you don’t want contributions.

Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto, uriz

Single-vendor open source projects are somewhat common, but are they actually “open source” in any useful sense of that term? It’s often said that open source is as much about community as code, but in a project with all committers and maintainers sitting behind the same firewall, there’s no real contributor community. So why bother with open source at all?

I asked that question of Twitter (yes, all of it). Turns out, there are good reasons to open source your code, even if you never expect a single other contributor to submit a pull request.

SEE: 10 ways to prevent developer burnout (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

A matter of persistence

The first reason may have nothing to do with community, but everything to do with posterity. According to Steven Rostedt, “To

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How and when to use the Recall feature in Outlook (and other email systems)

The Recall function in certain email systems allows senders to pull messages back if sent in error. Learn which systems this applies to and some of the stipulations with Microsoft Outlook email.

Image: iStock/anyaberkut

Outlook’s Recall feature, which ostensibly offers users a way to recall emails they have sent either by mistake, with incorrect or inappropriate information or in the heat of a bad moment, has been around for some time across numerous versions. Its usage was especially common when the “press Ctrl-Enter to send” problem was well underway (this can be disabled in Options and every place I’ve worked recently has done so via policies) … and also hilarious.

SEE: 69 Excel tips every user should master (TechRepublic)

Why hilarious? In the past it hasn’t been entirely reliable, and instead of NOT recalling the message, recipients have received a new message stating the sender tried to recall the prior

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