Amazon WorkSpaces cheat sheet: What you need to know about this DaaS product

Amazon’s Desktop as a Service product can virtualize the computing needs of your entire workforce, secure business data, and make life easier for remote employees and IT teams.

Illustration: Lisa Hornung/iStockPhoto

The modern workforce is more distributed than ever before, and the COVID-19 pandemic has only solidified the fact that working remotely is the way of the future for many businesses. That means the computing needs of modern businesses are changing as well—the perfect time for Desktop as a Service (DaaS) products like Amazon WorkSpaces to finally gain market traction.

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DaaS providers have been growing slower than expected over the past few years, but with the spread of the pandemic and the likely long-term shift to remote work, Gartner has reassessed its position on the battle between VDI and DaaS, calling DaaS one of the areas of tech experiencing the greatest growth

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Open source: Why naiveté might be the key to success

Commentary: What open source founders don’t know might be their superpower. Find out more in this interview with Envoy founder Matt Klein.

Image: Artur, Getty Images/iStockphoto

In our efforts to uncover the keys to open source success, we may be overlooking the most important attribute of all: Profound naïveté. Talk to Dries Buytaert (Drupal) or Daniel Stenberg (cURL) or [insert name of your preferred project founder] and in nearly every case they started their respective projects to “scratch an itch” with no real sense of how difficult the work would be. 

The same holds true for Matt Klein, founder of the popular Envoy project. Envoy is an open source edge and service proxy that today boasts significant contributions from Google, Apple, Salesforce, and others, but it started as one engineer’s quest to help his employer (Lyft) move from a monolithic architecture to a microservices-based infrastructure. The decision

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Drug companies shouldn’t play favorites in granting access to experimental covid-19 treatments

In the past month, US President Donald Trump and former New Jersey governor Chris Christie were diagnosed with covid-19 and spent time in the hospital, just like tens of thousands of other Americans nearly every day since the pandemic began.

But Trump and Christie were special cases. They received experimental covid-19 treatments that are not readily available to the general public. They have both since recovered and publicly acknowledged that US companies granted them access to drugs still off-limits to the vast majority of Americans with the disease.

Their treatment has generated a lot of conversation about the perception that the rich and famous have priority access to health care. What has received much less attention is whether these two men circumvented the rules to get access to experimental drugs outside clinical trials, and if so, how their actions could affect drug development.

Seriously ill patients with no other options

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